Let’s Toast Haggis On Burns Night

I visited Scotland for the first time last summer. It was an amazing trip filled with gorgeous scenery, incredible hospitality from relatives in Edinburgh and a fabulous (and music oriented) tour of Glasgow from The Vinyl Villain himself. The meals we had in Scotland did not disappoint. And I got to try Haggis!

I’m not sure if you are familiar with Haggis. It has some disgusting impressive ingredients including sheep tongue, liver, stomach and heart. Haggis is a traditional Scottish dish memorialized as the national dish of Scotland in the Robert Burns’ poem ‘Address To A Haggis’ penned in 1787. We’ll get back to Mr. Burns in a minute.

I really wanted to make some homemade Haggis to post here. Imagine the photos! I thought if Alton Brown can do it, than why not me?! So, I took my offal list to the butcher to see if he could procure me some sheep organs. Well, turns out he couldn’t. I’m not sure if I was disappointed or relieved. (I think relieved because with dozens of farms around here in Vermont, I’m sure I could have found a willing donor if I tried hard enough).

Lucky for me in nearby Woodstock there is a shop called Scotland By The Yard which sells all sorts of Celtic stuff. Including a nice neat can of Haggis.

The ingredients do not include tongue or stomach, but the heart and liver are there.

When we were in Edinburgh, my cousin-in-law (is there such a term?) who is a native Scotsman, served us Haggis on toast. It was swoon inducing, so that is what I am going to make for Burns Night.

Robert Burns, the famous Scottish poet, wrote in detail about Scottish culture and politics from the perspective of  an ordinary Scotsman in the late eighteenth century. His most famous works include ‘O, My Luve’s Like A Red, Red Rose’, ‘Auld Lang Syne’ and ‘Address To A Haggis’, of course. Burns Night is celebrated on January 25th to honor his life and poetry.

Here’s the recipe, which is almost as short as Mr. Burns’ life.

Haggis On Toast

Ingredients:

1 can Haggis
Hot, buttered toast

Directions:

1. Scoop the haggis into a bowl and microwave for about 4 minutes until it is piping hot.

2. Spread over buttered toast and cut into squares.

Now go pour a Scotch whisky and listen to this selection that I sheepishly offer you.

The Housemartins-Sheep

I like singing Auld Lang Syne, but I really like listening to Auld Lang Syne sing. This song is unbelievably good. Trust me.

Auld Lang Syne-Where My Fortune Lies

The Scottish Enlightment’s first full length album, St. Thomas, is out on Armellodie Records. You think their stuff is quiet, but the music is so full of emotion that it has a loud, insistent feel to it. Try this one. Buy this one.

The Scottish Enlightenment-The First Will Be The Last

Slàinte mhath!

About I Sing In The Kitchen

Music obsessed cooking freak whipping up fab food one song at at time.
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6 Responses to Let’s Toast Haggis On Burns Night

  1. nat says:

    Oh, haggis. Hubby was in pipe bands for years, and we’d attend Burns night annually. Always festive. Always single malts being raised to the poet and ALWAYS a reading of Address to a Haggis. There was a Scotsman with a booming voice, and he could have received an Oscar for his fabulous reading!
    The first haggis I tried was served before the bangers and mash dinner, and it was peppery and delightful. I expected that every time, but, depending on who made the dish, it could be dreadful. One year it was more livery, and I didn’t care for it.
    I just read an article about haggis this morning. Apparently, the US is still not allowing import of haggis from Scotland.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-12259126
    GIVE US OUR HAGGIS!!

  2. nat says:

    Oh, and The Housemartins. I love you.
    It’s happy hour again….

  3. noyrproduct says:

    & Auld Lang Syne from Rochester to boot. Thanks for a recipe I can cook.

  4. Rick says:

    Skip the haggis and go straight to the Scotch. ;)

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